Posted in Corrective Exercise

Foot and Ankle Mobility


The reason I chose to get certified through NASM as a Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES) is because EVERYBODY can benefit from corrective exercise. Even if you aren’t currently injured, corrective exercise knowledge is necessary to make sure that you are maintaining proper form and preventing injury in the future.

I wanted to take some time today to discuss the importance of your feet, ankles and knees. The gastrocnemius (main calf muscle), soleus (supporting calf muscle), anterior tibias (shin muscle), and peroneus (lateral shin muscle) all control the movement of the foot and ankle. Considering the contact you make with the ground at every step you take, this is a VERY important area of the body to take care of. Whether you sit all day or walk around all day, your calves can either be underused, and tight. Or they can be overused, and fatigued.

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High impact exercise, such as sports, running, or jumping put a lot of stress on the foot and ankle, which affects the knees, hips, so on and so forth. The following video has some great information about the importance of maintaining good dorsiflexion (pulling your toes towards you): https://www.facebook.com/MensHealth/videos/10156489542195207/ Williams College provides a comprehensive how-to on preventing ankle sprains. Considering how important our feet are to getting most of us from point A to point B, these exercises and stretches would be more than beneficial for everybody: http://health.williams.edu/keephealthy/general-health-concerns/preventing-ankle-sprains/

The following site also shows 9 at-home remedies using hot/cold water therapy, oils or spices, and massage techniques to help relieve the fatigue specifically in your foot. http://www.enkivillage.com/home-remedies-for-foot-pain.html

All of this information is brought to you to help keep you pain-free and your life active. As always, if you have any comments or questions, never hesitate to reach out.

Merrily,

Coral Jinright

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