Posted in Ketogenic Life

Digestive Enzymes: Pros and Cons

I’d like to start this discussion of digestive enzymes by providing data on the prevalence of digestive challenges in the United States from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. There are 60 to 70 million people affected annually by digestive diseases. In 2009, 245,921 deaths occurred in the United States in which one of many digestive diseases was the primary cause of death. The diseases include diagnoses like chronic constipation, hemorrhoids, GI infections, pancreatitis, abdominal wall hernias, diverticular disease, IBS, liver disease and viral hepatitis.

I hope this moves you to care for your digestive system more avidly.

This information should help you make more informed decisions about how to care for yourself. I’ve battled with digestive challenges my entire life, and I am finally learning applicable lessons that can transform the way my body processes, absorbs and utilizes the food and drinks I consume. A large debate exists between traditional medicine and functional medicine in regards to the implementation of digestive enzymes.

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In this video, Dr. Amy Meyers discusses when the supplementation of hydrochloric acid, the primary stomach acid, is appropriate. She does a marvelous job explaining where in the digestive process digestive enzymes should step in, and how functional medicine can be used when your digestive enzymes aren’t equipped to do the job on their own.

Many traditional medicine practitioners will prescribe medications to calm or alleviate the symptoms associated with the digestive challenge. Or they will tell you to cut everything out of your diet. Remove all of the food your body is having a hard time processing, and you’ll have no problems. That’s the thought at least. However, just like when a child has to get sick a couple of times to build immunity against all the sickness at school, your digestive system has to LEARN how to digest the foods you consume. That does not mean eat fried chicken every day to force your system into agreeing with it. That means you can not remove EVERYTHING from your diet to make the process less dynamic. Your digestive system was designed to consume unprocessed, nutritious food that’s made with integrity.

In discussing the hidden dangers of digestive enzymes, Dr. John Douillard summarizes what happens when digestive enzymes are utilized more frequently than necessary.

DIGESTIVE ENZYME SUMMARY

  1. Congested intestinal villi: stools that are too dry or too loose.
  2. Toxins drain from the gut to the liver.
  3. The bile in the liver becomes congested.
  4. The bile becomes too thick to flow through the bile ducts.
  5. Thick bile coats the pancreatic enzyme ducts.
  6. Small intestines signal for more bile and enzymes.
  7. Bile and enzyme ducts end up over-crowded and in digestive gridlock.
  8. Digestive fire weakens and food intolerances can appear
  9. Long-term enzyme dependency ignores the potentially serious underlying cause.

Dr. Douillard shares great insight on how you can avoid digestive disasters by consuming apples, beets, celery, artichokes, leafy greens and turmeric. It is beneficial for your digestive system to be cleansed on a regular basis. When you are constantly in a cleansing state, however, you can cleanse yourself into having a digestive system that only works if they keep cleansing it. Douillard calls these people cleansing casualties. It is recommended to pick one or two days a week to provide the cleanse your body needs to strengthen the system once again.

Take the necessary steps to further educate yourself on healthy digestion and how doing so can help brain function, hormone stability and longevity.

Cheers,

Coral A.J. Gibson

 

Posted in Ketogenic Life

Break Through KETO Weight-Loss Plateaus

I’ve had a few people this month ask me how they can break through the weight loss plateau they are experiencing after months of being on a ketogenic diet and taking exogenous ketones. First, props to them for keeping up with the ketogenic lifestyle for months! Many people can’t find the desire or discipline to stick with it for more than a couple weeks; so way to go! Second, it is PERFECTLY normal to experience a plateau in your weight loss goal; the trick is to not let it defeat you. If you’ve been at this plateau for more than three weeks, today’s message will help you learn how to break through it!

In this interview on Cut the Killer Carbs, Dr. Justin Anderson discusses a few of the challenges his clients are experiencing during their metabolic coaching programs. He says about 10% of metabolic coaching clients experience these plateaus.  The Whoosh Effect is the collection of instances when your body can go a certain period of time with no movement in the weight, then all of a sudden drop a couple pounds and go right back to no movement. Here a few tricks to break your plateau:

  1. Count your carbs, religiously, for three days. After awhile, you become lax on your carb consumption. Put yourself back in check.
  2. Take a look at current medications, as some are associated with weight gain.
  3. Check your axial temperature in the morning to see if you have inadequate thyroid function.
  4. Take omega 3 fatty acids!
  5. Consider a light exercise regimen.
  6. Try two weeks of dairy to see if your body is sensitive to it.
  7. If you’re on current thyroid meds, switch from generic to name brand for more bioavailability.
  8. Watch out for farm-raised fish; get wild caught only.
  9. Remove diet sodas and artificial sweeteners.
  10. Don’t let your “cheats” go too far.
  11. Utilize intermittent fasting.

Here is another great resource for even more tips on how to break through your plateau, including eating too much or too little!

My personal recommendation for my clients is to change your daily routine. If you’ve been following the same regimen for more than six months, give your body something new to work with. Do high intensity movement for 5 minutes before you start your day. Use intermittent fasting at a different 8 hour time slot in the day. Up your exogenous ketone consumption a little! If you’ve been using 1/2 packet twice a day for months, try using 1/2 packet three times a day for a bit. If you haven’t implement the use of exogenous ketones in your weight loss journey, start now and see if that brings your cellular regeneration to a new level!

I hope this will help you get where you’re looking to go. As always, if these tips aren’t helping you break through, consult a medical professional to address your body’s needs.

Best of Luck,

Coral Jinright-Gibson

Posted in Ketogenic Life

Gut Health and Ketosis

It’s no question if gut health should be at the top of your list of health goals. Yet, surprisingly, many people will focus much more on cosmetic and aesthetic “health” and completely bypass what’s going on inside their bodies. The microbiome in the gut is highly influenced by the types of food we put into it. Primarily, sugar and “empty” carbs are the ones in question here. You can imagine that, if sugar is bad for the brain, it’s not so good for the intestines either! We will now explore this with a view interviews!

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In this interview, Eric Westman MD talks about how the ketogenic diet affects the health of our digestion and the trillions of microbes inside our guts. Contrary ideas are also brought to the table in an attempt to truly understand what takes place when sugar and empty carbs are removed from our diet.

 

In this interview, David Perlmutter MD, a board certified neurologist, discusses how the removal of grains and the inclusion of a ketogenic diet could aid in protecting our brains for life. The power of gut microbes is incredible, but fat got the blame for its decline in recent decades, contrary to practices by humans over thousands of years.

Both of these interviews are full of knowledge, as well as links to other books and research articles to expand what you know about the connection between the brain and the gut microbiome and just how helpful ketosis is in maintaining the health of both.

Health and happiness,

Coral Jinright

 

Posted in Ketogenic Life

The Importance of Green

Well… money is important. But what I’m talking about here is nutritious GREENS!

When individuals start following the ketogenic lifestyle, they will include an abundance of fat with a moderate amount of protein. This is a solid foundation. For optimal gut health and utilization of these fats and proteins, it is imperative to include greens in your diet. Non-starchy leafy greens and vegetables are necessary to ensure your gut biome is in homeostasis and maintain blood sugar. The Ketogenic Diet Resource site maintained by Ellen Davis MS is an absolutely incredible aid in your transition to the ketogenic lifestyle. This site debunks myths, presents the applications of the ketogenic diet and shares recipes, food plans and medicinal applications of the lifestyle. There are also books by Ellen Davis listed that can be purchased to broaden your horizon in the field: Fight Cancer with a Ketogenic Diet, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes, and many more.

This article written by Ellen Davis in the Well Being Journal in the July/August 2012 issue discusses why the ketogenic lifestyle is key to excellent health. “Small amounts of ROS are created as part of normal cellular respiration, and our cells have been equipped with various antioxidant molecules to disarm them.” We all know it doesn’t stop here. Oxidative stress from daily life contributes to the formation of free radicals in the human body, which are the cause of what we call inflammation. The inclusion of greens into your diet will also help balance your body’s electrolytes: sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg). Electrolytes are found in the body’s fluids including urine and blood and provide an electric charge that controls all involuntary bodily functions as well as muscle contraction and relaxation. In conjunction with greens, exogenous ketones will help electrolytes balance with little intervention on your end. Learn more about electrolyte balance and its significance in your body.

I hope this has been helpful to you, and that you’ve got a handful of asparagus and spinach ready for dinner tonight!

Cheers!

Coral Jinright