Posted in Of Heart and Mind

Your Brain on Gratitude

‘Tis the season. Thanksgiving is here, and soon, Christmas will be, too. Today, in church service, we discovered how our body and mind respond to experiencing gratitude on a regular basis. This is what we will be discussing today.

An individual is positively affected neurologically, physically and emotionally when they experience gratitude regularly. The Huffington Post wrote an article called “The Neuroscience of Gratitude” which shares the following implications of gratitude:

  • production of dopamine and serotonin increases
  • it can be a natural antidepressant
  • the more these neural pathways are fired, the more automatic it becomes
  • encourages the search for constructive themes, rather than destructive ones

A study conducted in 2015 by four researchers created a four-condition experiment (stimulus, reflection, probe and rest) where participants read an excerpt telling of one of four phases of the Holocaust: 1. The rise of Nazism and Persecution, 2. Internment, 3. The Final Solution, 4. Final Months and Liberation. After reading the excerpt, they were instructed to reflect and feel, as much as possible, how it would feel to experience what they had just read, and create a deep, personal, realistic reaction. Then, they had to rate how much gratitude they felt on a scale from 1 to 4. A black screen would then be presented, as they were instructed to rest and release their mind of all thoughts for a 12-16 second period, acting as a baseline prior to the next phase. The four conditions of the experiment are shown in the figure below. The hypothesis? “That gratitude ratings would correlate with activity in brain regions associated with moral cognition, value judgment and theory of mind.”

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Experiment Protocol

The results? “Ratings of gratitude correlated with brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, in support of our hypotheses. The results provide a window into the brain circuitry for moral cognition and positive emotion that accompanies the experience of benefitting from the goodwill of others.”

How awesome! When we feel grateful, we begin to elicit the positive emotion that comes from experiencing the benefit of a gift from someone. Even amidst tragedy and shortfall, simply “thinking” gratitude into existence will rewire the neural pathways to make it a habit for emotional well-being.

Here are four ways that you can practice gratitude:

  1. Write it down. On a daily basis, write down at least 5 things you are grateful for.
  2. Get into a routine of gratitude. You can have an accountability partner; you can write it every morning before you start your day; you can keep a list posted to be reminded daily. Whatever works for you.
  3. Meditate. You can do so sitting quietly or during your favorite exercise activity, such as yoga, pilates or even running.
  4. Surround yourself with people who share gratitude, too. These people might be family, co-workers or your church friends. Make sure you are not exposed to complaints every day. Be grateful and help others do the same.

Best Wishes,

Coral A.J. Gibson

Posted in Ketogenic Life

Digestive Enzymes: Pros and Cons

I’d like to start this discussion of digestive enzymes by providing data on the prevalence of digestive challenges in the United States from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. There are 60 to 70 million people affected annually by digestive diseases. In 2009, 245,921 deaths occurred in the United States in which one of many digestive diseases was the primary cause of death. The diseases include diagnoses like chronic constipation, hemorrhoids, GI infections, pancreatitis, abdominal wall hernias, diverticular disease, IBS, liver disease and viral hepatitis.

I hope this moves you to care for your digestive system more avidly.

This information should help you make more informed decisions about how to care for yourself. I’ve battled with digestive challenges my entire life, and I am finally learning applicable lessons that can transform the way my body processes, absorbs and utilizes the food and drinks I consume. A large debate exists between traditional medicine and functional medicine in regards to the implementation of digestive enzymes.

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In this video, Dr. Amy Meyers discusses when the supplementation of hydrochloric acid, the primary stomach acid, is appropriate. She does a marvelous job explaining where in the digestive process digestive enzymes should step in, and how functional medicine can be used when your digestive enzymes aren’t equipped to do the job on their own.

Many traditional medicine practitioners will prescribe medications to calm or alleviate the symptoms associated with the digestive challenge. Or they will tell you to cut everything out of your diet. Remove all of the food your body is having a hard time processing, and you’ll have no problems. That’s the thought at least. However, just like when a child has to get sick a couple of times to build immunity against all the sickness at school, your digestive system has to LEARN how to digest the foods you consume. That does not mean eat fried chicken every day to force your system into agreeing with it. That means you can not remove EVERYTHING from your diet to make the process less dynamic. Your digestive system was designed to consume unprocessed, nutritious food that’s made with integrity.

In discussing the hidden dangers of digestive enzymes, Dr. John Douillard summarizes what happens when digestive enzymes are utilized more frequently than necessary.

DIGESTIVE ENZYME SUMMARY

  1. Congested intestinal villi: stools that are too dry or too loose.
  2. Toxins drain from the gut to the liver.
  3. The bile in the liver becomes congested.
  4. The bile becomes too thick to flow through the bile ducts.
  5. Thick bile coats the pancreatic enzyme ducts.
  6. Small intestines signal for more bile and enzymes.
  7. Bile and enzyme ducts end up over-crowded and in digestive gridlock.
  8. Digestive fire weakens and food intolerances can appear
  9. Long-term enzyme dependency ignores the potentially serious underlying cause.

Dr. Douillard shares great insight on how you can avoid digestive disasters by consuming apples, beets, celery, artichokes, leafy greens and turmeric. It is beneficial for your digestive system to be cleansed on a regular basis. When you are constantly in a cleansing state, however, you can cleanse yourself into having a digestive system that only works if they keep cleansing it. Douillard calls these people cleansing casualties. It is recommended to pick one or two days a week to provide the cleanse your body needs to strengthen the system once again.

Take the necessary steps to further educate yourself on healthy digestion and how doing so can help brain function, hormone stability and longevity.

Cheers,

Coral A.J. Gibson

 

Posted in Ketogenic Life

Intermittent Fasting

Let’s talk about how intermittent fasting will revolutionize your brain and metabolism.

The benefits are numerous, yet the most important is a simpler and longer life. I imagine you’ve seen people meal prepping, packing 6 meals a day to eat every two hours on the hour like clockwork. Doing so makes your body dependent on the incoming food. Your brain counts down the minutes, your insulin spikes and crashes and your hormones make you hangry if you are a few minutes late. Intermittent fasting is the opposite!

Intermittent fasting (IF) means that you will consume fewer meals and practice  more periods of fasting. There are multiple schedules you can follow. The easiest to follow, and the one I recommend beginners do to start, is to wake up, drink their ketones and wait to have their first meal until they are truly hungry. This will help the body relearn the signals for hunger rather than just following culture and time patterns. For many, that time comes around 12-1pm. They then use an 8 hour feeding window, so their last meal of the day should be consumed before 8-9pm.

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As I discussed last week, your body might reach a plateau when following any routine for an extended period of time. When your body is ready for a new routine, you can implement one of the other intermittent fasting schedule options outlined by Intermittent Fasting 101 from Keto Kookie. As your body gets more accustomed to this new way of eating, you might implement a full 24- or 48-hour fast. Doing so regularly will dramatically help with cell regeneration, ridding your body of toxins, allowing it to recover from the abundance of tasks it has daily. Intermittent Fasting can also help in chronic disease prevention as The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition discusses here.

*Note: While Intermittent Fasting is widely regarded as the optimal way to eat, you should always talk to a doctor before making dietary decisions.

Challenge yourself to start Intermittent Fasting beginning with dinner this Sunday night.

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

To health and happiness,

Coral Gibson

Posted in Corrective Exercise, Ketogenic Life, Of Heart and Mind

Requests for Research

Hello everyone! Thanks for supporting Coral Jinright Fitness! If you are not yet a subscriber to my weekly emails, please complete the following form to receive weekly email updates! Share with friends and family about this great opportunity to stay in the know! This is such an exciting thing I get to offer to ensure that your knowledge base is always growing, and your steps to action in sharing your knowledge grows even faster! This post is going to be short, sweet and simple.

Please comment on this post with a topic you’d like to learn more about. The topic with the most comments will become my FIRST short video to share with you and yours. It can be anything related to success, health and fitness!

Examples include:

  • ketones and inflammation
  • insulin stability
  • low back pain
  • insufficient energy
  • sleeping posture
  • ketones and seizures
  • muscle mass preservation
  • time prioritization
  • SO MANY MORE!!

Do not be afraid to comment about what YOU need more of in your life.

Also check out this incredible video featuring Rob DeBoer discussing the bioavailability of KETO//OS MAX and how this ketone technology is already changing millions of lives worldwide!
https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fjustpruvit%2Fvideos%2F1043839302398171%2F&show_text=0&width=560

Your life can only be as good as you praise your self to be!

Awaiting your responses,

Coral Jinright

 

Posted in Ketogenic Life

Ketones and Sleep

Thank you for your patience! I slacked off on my posts the past couple of weeks. But I’m back and ready to rock and roll!! Today’s topic is SLEEP. I’ve gotten so many clients who have raved about how much sleep has improved upon implementing their exogenous ketones on a daily basis. Rather than taking hours to fall asleep or waking up multiple times a night, they begin experiencing SLEEP!! And if you know anything about sleep, it is the most powerful form of mental and physical recovery and stress relief.

As avid exercisers, the exogenous ketones help repair inflammation in both body and brain tissues more rapidly and effectively!! How incredible is that?!

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If you don’t get sufficient sleep! (General terms)

Sleep is entirely a brain thing. Neuroscience can dig into the concept of sleep in more detail than you could ever imagine. Conditions such as epilepsy, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, TBI, concussions (among others) are 100% controlled by the brain. In providing more fuel to the brain to reduce inflammation and provide circulation of blood and nutrients through the use of exogenous ketones, your brain may be able to heal itself. Once again, you will be able to thoroughly enjoy the beauty sleep we all require. Giving the brain this super jet fuel (as many people have come to call it!) also makes sure the brain does not get depleted of vital nutrients, which may restrict certain parts of the brain unannounced.

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If you don’t get sufficient sleep! (Science jargon)

For today’s post, I would like to share with you some fantastic podcasts and videos that you are able to listen to during a busy day. You can plug it in and listen while you go on a trail walk, or play it on your computer speakers while you clean up the house. Whatever you may be doing, take some time to listen to the abundance of knowledge the following experts bring to the conversation.

This first one is from Tim Ferriss’ podcast as he talks with Dr. Dominic D’Agostino (whom you’ve heard about plenty on my site) and Dr. Peter Attia on the topic of exogenous ketones and jet fuel! http://fourhourworkweek.com/2015/11/03/dominic-dagostino/

On this second site, Dr. D’Agostino’s blog site, he shares a TED Talk he presented discussing the use of the ketogenic diet for patients with epilepsy and cancer. http://ketonutrition.blogspot.com/2014/02/the-charlie-foundation-for-ketogenic.html?view=sidebar

Wishing you a good night’s rest,

Coral J.

cj1005.pruvitnow.com

Posted in Of Heart and Mind

Depression, PTSD and Other Mental Illnesses

Every week, we come into contact with new people that enter our lives. These people can be introduced into your life as clients, friends, customers, co-workers, love interests, and even family you’ve never met before. One thing that we all possess is a real self, which is the person that we are currently living as. However, we all also possess an ideal self, that person we wish or aim to become. This is something I studied in great detail my junior year at Hendrix College in Dr. Dana Leighton’s Social Cognition course when I wrote this research paper discussing The Salience of Guilt, Self-Blame and Hopelessness.

fully functioning person, according to Carl Rogers, a humanistic psychologist, is one who is possesss these five characteristics:

  1. Open to experience: both positive and negative emotions accepted. Negative feelings are not denied, but worked through.
  2. Existential living: being able to live and fully appreciate the present, allowing themselves to experience life, not always looking back to the past or forward to the future.
  3. Trust feelings: decisions made ourselves due to feeling, instincts and gut-reactions are paid attention to and trusted.
  4. Creativity: not playing safe all the time, taking risks and thinking creatively, including the ability to adjust and change and seek new experiences.
  5. Fulfilled life: happy and satisfied with one’s life, yet looking for new challenges and experiences.

Such a person also exists when the individual is able to accept that our selves are not in congruent (the real self is not full equivalent to the the ideal self), and is patient and understanding with themselves in working towards becoming as such. But what happens when the individuals does not accept the gap between the real self and the ideal self is most frequently mental illness, such as depression, post traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, bipolar disorder, etc. This is something that I dedicated a significant amount of my time to research. In fact, I intend to continue to pursue research and turn my paper (referred to at the top of the page) into a fully comprehensible book on what this all means. It’s something that I am very passionate about.

Please take the 30 minutes it may require to really read through this information and digest it. Something as fundamental as this is a big reason why there is disconnect in our society. So many people don’t believe they are capable of ever becoming their ideal self, and therefore revoke their ability to be fully functioning people contributing to society. Similarly, most people witness the impediments faced by such a person and are unable to put their egos aside. They can’t understand that the person they see can’t just set aside their concerns and instantaneously become the person they wish to be. The concept of patience is simple, but hardly practiced.

Just a tidbit to take with you as you embark on new journeys. Have a marvelous weekend!

Ever so graciously,

Coral Jinright

Resources:

 

Posted in Corrective Exercise

Foot and Ankle Mobility

The reason I chose to get certified through NASM as a Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES) is because EVERYBODY can benefit from corrective exercise. Even if you aren’t currently injured, corrective exercise knowledge is necessary to make sure that you are maintaining proper form and preventing injury in the future.

I wanted to take some time today to discuss the importance of your feet, ankles and knees. The gastrocnemius (main calf muscle), soleus (supporting calf muscle), anterior tibias (shin muscle), and peroneus (lateral shin muscle) all control the movement of the foot and ankle. Considering the contact you make with the ground at every step you take, this is a VERY important area of the body to take care of. Whether you sit all day or walk around all day, your calves can either be underused, and tight. Or they can be overused, and fatigued.

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High impact exercise, such as sports, running, or jumping put a lot of stress on the foot and ankle, which affects the knees, hips, so on and so forth. The following video has some great information about the importance of maintaining good dorsiflexion (pulling your toes towards you): https://www.facebook.com/MensHealth/videos/10156489542195207/ Williams College provides a comprehensive how-to on preventing ankle sprains. Considering how important our feet are to getting most of us from point A to point B, these exercises and stretches would be more than beneficial for everybody: http://health.williams.edu/keephealthy/general-health-concerns/preventing-ankle-sprains/

The following site also shows 9 at-home remedies using hot/cold water therapy, oils or spices, and massage techniques to help relieve the fatigue specifically in your foot. http://www.enkivillage.com/home-remedies-for-foot-pain.html

All of this information is brought to you to help keep you pain-free and your life active. As always, if you have any comments or questions, never hesitate to reach out.

Merrily,

Coral Jinright

Posted in Corrective Exercise

Hips and Back Not Feeling So Hot?

If you are facing someone, and your hips are facing more than a couple degrees either right or left, then your pelvis may be rotated a little more than is safe for your spine and low back! I know it’s something that I have been struggling with, as my right hip hikes up towards my rib cage causing my hips to rotate facing the left while my toes and chest are straight ahead. This indicates an imbalance in the hip flexors and hip extensors. The following picture shows the location and names of such muscles.

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Now, a few simple isometric exercises and stretches can be utilized in order to relieve the pain in the hip, knee and low back area associated with a hip rotation to either side of the body. If you have a job standing on your feet all the time, you might not notice it, but there are times you may rest more weight on one foot than the other. If you spend most of your day sitting, you might cross one leg over the other or lean one arm onto the table and keep the other side tall. In either case, you have to become aware of such habits in order to keep this rotation from reoccurring chronically. Try some of these fantastic isometric exercises demonstrated by Hands On Therapy in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ntO6AAPslc

After warming up the muscles just a little bit, you can even try some of these yoga positions at home or even in the gym. Even spending 10 minutes a day can tremendously improve low back pain, pelvic rotation and even stress and energy levels.

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http://www.yogajournal.com/pose/upward-facing-dog/

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http://www.yogajournal.com/pose/extended-puppy-pose/

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http://www.yogajournal.com/pose/garland-pose/

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http://www.yogajournal.com/slideshow/3-ways-make-pigeon-pose-feel-better/#0

The pictures only show the pose, but you can visit the link under each picture to get step by step instructions on how to properly execute it and what muscles to “focalize on” (focus and utilize) during the movement! Spread the love and share this with a friend who may spend too much time sitting at school, a mom who hurts from carrying her young kiddo on her hip all the time, or even a co-worker who knows exactly how you feel. As always, if you have any questions or would like any more guidance, never hesitate to comment below or message me!

Happily,

Coral Jinright